The Wildlife Assessment Check is using geospatial data as outlined below.

Statutory designated sites

The Wildlife Assessment is using datasets on statutory designated sites for nature conservation in the UK. These are all published under Open Government Licence and are acknowledged here.

Local Environmental Records Centre (LERC) boundaries

The spatial data for LERC boundaries has been provided by the Association of Local Environmental Records Centres (ALERC).

Local Authority District boundaries

The spatial data for local authority district boundaries, published by the Office for National Statistics, is supplied under the Open Government Licence. Contains National Statistics data © Crown copyright (December 2017) and OS data © Crown copyright (December 2017).

Important Invertebrate Area (IIA) boundaries

The Wildlife Assessment Check is using spatial data for the IIA boundaries, provided by Buglife. The underlying data (e.g. habitat interest and key species) for the IIAs is not being used by the tool.

Click here to view IIA map
Important Invertebrate Area map (Buglife)

Important Plant Areas (IPAs)

The Wildlife Assessment Check is using spatial data for the IPAs, provided by Plantlife.

Click here to view IPA map
Important Plant Area Map (Plantlife)

Species range polygons

The Wildlife Assessment Check uses range polygons for some species, listed in the table below. These polygons cover England, Wales and Scotland. The Wildlife Assessment Check uses the range polygons as location triggers and does not hold any species records/data.

Species acknowledgments:

    • Mammals: Mathews, F., Kubasiewicz, L., Gurnell, J., Harrower, C., Mcdonald, R., and Shore, R. (2018) A review of the population and conservation status of British mammals: A report by The Mammal Society under contract to Natural England, Natural Resources Wales and Scottish Natural Heritage. Natural England.
    • Great crested newts: The range polygon for Great Crested Newt was produced using expert assessment by Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Trust, based on recent published and unpublished datasets and species distribution modelling.
    • Rare amphibians and reptiles: The range polygons were produced by the Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Trust.
Mammals Serotine bat

See range polygon map
Serotine bat

Alcathoe bat

See range polygon map
Alcathoe bat map

Brandt’s bat

See range polygon map
Brandt’s bat map

Natterers bat

See range polygon map
Natterers bat map

Whiskered bat

See range polygon map
Whiskered bat map

Lesser noctule bat

See range polygon map
Lesser Noctule bat map

Grey Long Eared bat

See range polygon map
Grey Long Eared bat map

Nathusius bat

See range polygon map
Nathusius’ pipistrelle

Hazel dormouse

See range polygon map
Harvest Mouse map (Source: NBN Gateway)

Pine marten

See range polygon map
Pine Martin map (Source: NBN Gateway)

Red squirrel

See range polygon map
Red Squirrel map (Source: NBN Gateway)

Wildcat

See range polygon map
Wild Cat map (Source: NBN Gateway)

European (brown) hare

See range polygon map
European Brown Hare map (Source: NBN Gateway)

Common vole

See range polygon map
Common Vole map (Source: NBN Gateway)

Polecat

See range polygon map
Pole Cat map (Source: NBN Gateway)

Harvest mouse

See range polygon map
Harvest Mouse map (Source: NBN Gateway)

Mountain hare

See range polygon map
Mountain Hare map (Source: NBN Gateway)

Great crested newts
See range polygon map

Rare amphibians Natterjack toad

See range polygon map

Pool frog

See range polygon map
Pool frog map (source: ARC Trust)

Rare reptiles Sand lizard

See range polygon map
Sand Lizard map (Source: ARC Trust)

Smooth snake

See range polygon map
Smooth Snake map (Source: ARC Trust)

 

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